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Workforce Research Studies

New - NASW Occupational Profiles

Social Workers in Hospice and Palliative Care

Social Workers in Schools

Social Workers in Colleges
and Universities

Social Workers in
Government Agencies

Social Workers in Health
Clinics & Outpatient Health Care Settings

Social Workers in Hospitals
& Medical Centers

Social Workers in Private Practice

Social Workers Salaries by Race & Ethnicity

Social Workers in Mental Health Clinics &
Outpatient Facilities

Social Workers in
Psychiatric Hospitals

Social Workers in Social Services Agencies

Social Work Salaries by Gender

 

Child Welfare Technology Report

CHILD WELFARE SOCIAL WORKERS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD MOBILE TECHNOLOGY TOOLS: IS THERE A GENERATION GAP?

Daily, countless child welfare workers face critical life and death decisions and carry high case loads with limited supervision and support. Unfortunately, these factors often affect the safety, permanence and well-being of children, youth and families in addition to the recruitment and retention of qualified child welfare staff. Child welfare workers are often overburdened and work under intense pressure with limited resources. They are expected to conduct interviews and home visits, attend court hearings
and conduct various administrative tasks including but not limited to, entering data into state systems to processing paperwork to ensure that vendors (e.g., child care providers, foster parents, and therapists, etc.) receive timely payments. Child welfare workers currently have to serve more families with fewer resources. Fortunately, child welfare administrators across the country have begun to recognize that access to emerging information technology can boost the efficiency of overtaxed
workers.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRIMINAL JUSTICE SOCIAL WORK IN THE UNITED STATES: ADAPTING TO NEW CHALLENGES

Social workers have had a defined role in providing services to incarcerated individuals since the inception of the profession in 1904 (Roberts & Springer, 2007). Social work has since evolved as an essential component of the nation’s criminal justice system For the most part, social work practice as performed in the various criminal (and juvenile) justice systems in the United States is variously referred to as criminal justice social work, correctional social work, or forensic social work. The term criminal justice social work (CJSW) will be used throughout this discussion.

2009 COMPENSATION & BENEFITS STUDY
SUMMARY OF KEY COMPENSATION FINDINGS
May 2010

As a service to its members and the profession, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) has developed and administered this comprehensive
salary survey of professional social workers in the United States.

Other Studies - Click here for a listing of NASW Workforce Reports

Professional Development

This report highlights the professional development characteristics of the survey participants and explores the continuing education training content areas, the accessibility of continuing education activities, the importance of professional development in social work, and the extent of employers' support and contribution to the professional development of social workers.

Who Wants to be a Social Worker?
Career Influences and Timing

Some people decide at a very young age what they want to be “when they grow up.” Others don’t decide until much later, and still others make this decision more than once in their lifetimes.

Attention Researchers!  2004 Workforce Study Dataset Available

Media Watch

Media Coverage of Workforce Studies
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