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2004 National study of Licensed Social Workers Demographic Fact Sheet – Hispanic/Latino Social Workers*

  • Most Hispanic/Latino social workers (86%) hold an MSW degree; 11 percent hold a BSW degree, and 3 percent hold a doctoral degree.
  • Hispanic/Latino social workers are the least likely of all racial/ethnic groups to hold a DSW degree.
  • Hispanics/Latino social workers are three times more likely than Non-Hispanic, White and Black/African American social workers to be enrolled in an MSW program.
  • Hispanics/Latino social workers spend more time than social workers of other racial/ethnic groups performing community organizing activities (2.2 hours per week on average) and planning (5.6 hours on average).
  • Most Hispanic/Latino social workers (78%) are employed in private not-for-profit, state government, and local government sectors. They are the most likely of all racial/ethnic groups to be employed by the federal government and the least likely to be in the private for-profit sector.
  • Hispanic/Latino social workers are more likely than social workers of other racial/ethnic groups to be employed in a case management and public health agencies and the least likely to be employed in hospice and private solo or group practice.
  • Hispanic/Latino social workers employed full-time are primarily in social service agencies (17%), schools (17%), and hospitals/medical centers (14%).
  • Hispanic/Latino social workers are the largest racial/ethnic group represented in the practice areas of child welfare, school social work, and medical health. They are the smallest group represented in the practice areas of higher education, addictions, and working with adolescents.
  • Hispanic/Latino social workers are less likely than social workers of other racial/ethnic groups to work in small towns and rural areas.
  • The average salary of Hispanic social workers is $53,400.
  • Most Hispanic/Latino social workers (91%) plan to remain in the field for the next two years.
  • Nearly 60 percent of Hispanic/Latino social workers plan to remain in their current position over the next two years. Their career plans generally consist of seeking new opportunities or promotion with their current employer or pursuing continuing education in social work.
  • The most important factors that influence Hispanic/Latino social workers' decision to change jobs are higher salary, lifestyle/family concerns, and stress of current job.

*n = 155 Back

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